How to Survive your Summer Job

Now that it is officially summer, seasonal jobs are popular among teens and professionals (i.e. teachers/professors) seeking extra money. How else are you supposed to get those coveted Louboutins or that gorgeous Rebecca Minkoff bag? Some typical jobs include lifeguarding (i.e. pool guard or surf rescue technician), camp counseling, restaurant service jobs and of course internships. And, yes! You must treat an internship as a job.

Lifeguarding can be tedious, but enjoyable. If you’re a pool guard, you may feel more like a babysitter than you do a lifeguard. Kids can be rowdy and disrespectful. Your whistle may become your best friend. Instead of getting irritated, take a deep breath and realize you’re there to enforce pool safety. Maybe dealing with kids isn’t the issue at your job; maybe it’s your manager giving you ridiculous tasks like cleaning. Remember, everyone starts somewhere and it is always good to impress the boss by accepting a task with no complaints.

Working on the beach as a lifeguard is completely different. In Ocean City Maryland, lifeguards are called Surf Rescue Technicians. Beach guards have to worry about the surf, the current, which way the tide is going, whether there are rip currents and typical rule breakers. Children can act just as rowdy, and some parents expect lifeguards on the beach to be babysitters as well. When a surf rescue technician goes on a rescue, they do it with determination and purpose. If you are a beach guard, you need to remember why you are there, and why you picked this summer job.

Speaking of children, if you absolutely love them, being a camp counselor is definitely the right job for you. At least that is what you thought when you applied and accepted a camp counselor position. Most summer camps are split into age groups or levels depending on the type of camp. Dealing with kids on a day-to-day basis can be rough–I know from experience.

I taught Ocean City’s Junior Beach Patrol as an assistant instructor for two summers. The program consisted of kids ages 10 to 17. My job was to help them understand what the Ocean City Beach Patrol does. These kids were divided into different levels based on their age and how many times they have done the program. Each level involved a run and swim test on the first day, similar to beach patrol testing. I taught these kids how to tackle the surf in order to make rescues, as well as how to make paddle board rescues and what to look for in order to make a rescue. They also participated in relay races and team building exercises. Working with kids can have perks and challenges. The key is to pick and choose your battles.

Currently, I work for a large restaurant/night club in Ocean City Maryland. I am a food runner, which means I carry food to the tables and bars. I began to hostess during my senior year of high school, and moved up to this position the summer before I went into college. This is my third summer working here. I do not mind carrying large trays, stacking sauces, delivering pizzas to the pizza stand, and grabbing extra sauces for tables. I do mind when people are rude, disrespectful, and belittle me because I work in a restaurant. If you ever feel this way, take a deep breath and laugh. You just have to let it go. For some who work in the restaurant industry, dealing with your manager(s) can be difficult. You need to remember most managers ask and tell you things to improve the overall productivity of your job. I am thankful to work with wonderful managers.

If you’re interested in a job in retail, check out The Retail Life. There are thousands of listings and best of all, it’s free to sign up when you use “LUSH” as your referral code! Read more about this awesome retail community here.

So no matter what your summer job, remember to continue to work hard, keep calm, and respect your supervisors. It will all be worth it in the end!

Do you have a job this summer? What tips would you add to the list?

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